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Arizona Lawmakers Hope to Put Dent in Opioid Crisis

Gov. Doug Ducey greets Senate Minority Leader Katie Hobbs on Monday ahead of calling a special legislative session to enact what is billed as a bipartisan approach to dealing with the opioid crisis. (Capitol Media Services/Howard Fischer)

Lawmakers hope to put dent in opioid crisis

Originally Published: January 24, 2018 5:55 a.m.

By Howard Fischer, Capitol Media Services

PHOENIX — State lawmakers begin working today (eds: tuesday) on a bipartisan plan state officials hope will make a significant dent in opioid addiction, abuse and deaths in Arizona.

“In 2016, more than two Arizonans died each day due to an opioid overdose,’’ Dr. Cara Christ, the state’s health director, said at a ceremony where Gov. Doug Ducey signed a proclamation for a special legislative session to deal with the issue.

“Since 2012, we’ve seen an increase of 74 percent in opiod-related deaths,’’ she continued. “Drug overdoses kill more Arizonans than car accidents.’’

The proposal contains money designed to help provide treatment for those who are addicted. The state already does some of that through its Medicaid program. This package contains $10 million for those whose income leaves them unqualified for that.

But the governor said the measure also has a strong element designed to prevent addiction in the first place. That’s built around a five-day limit on how much opioids that doctors can prescribe to patients who have not been on the drug for at least 60 days.

“You’re talking about really taking advantage of the data and facts that we understand how someone gets addicted,’’ he said.

“When it goes past five days or six days, that’s when the incidence of addiction skyrocket,’’ Ducey continued. “So the objective here was not only to treat people that are suffering addiction so that they can get off it but to prevent future addictions and overdoses from happening.’’

But he said the legislation should not harm others.

“People that have chronic pain, people that are suffering from chronic pain and are already benefitting from these miracle drugs, there will be no change for them,’’ he said.

The governor called the measure “the most aggressive piece of public policy, the most thorough and thoughtful piece of public policy that’s been introduced in years.’’

Legislative Democrats are willing to go along, especially once they got that $10 million for addiction treatment. But they don’t see this as a cure all.

“It’s a thoughtful and thorough first step,’’ said Senate Minority Leader Katie Hobbs. “We won’t win this battle in one year.’’

State lawmakers actually already are in session. And there is no legal reason why the pieces of the proposal cannot be added to the regular legislative agenda.

But by calling a concurrent special session, Ducey sets the stage to go from proposal to finished law in three days.

“This is not being rushed through at all,’’ the governor told reporters after the ceremony. He said the measure has been in the works since September, with input from members of the medical community, law enforcement, addiction experts.

“And now it will be debated in the light of day in both of our chambers,’’ Ducey said.

“We needed urgency and focus on this issue, which is a crisis in our state,’’ he explained. “It called for a special session.’’

But what it also does is shorten the amount of time for people to read and scrutinize the final legislation — it was still not printed as of Monday afternoon — and be able to seek changes.

There are some potential flash points.

For example, the proclamation for the session says there will be new enforcement procedures to go after doctors who overprescribe not just opioids but other similar drugs. That could raise questions from doctors who specialize in pain management.

Ducey also wants to allow the state to charge companies that manufacture opioids as well as their executives with felonies for misrepresenting the effectiveness and addictive nature of their wares.

And the governor proposes to require insurance companies to expedite authorization for certain kinds of treatments. That is based on concerns that while patients are awaiting the go-ahead from insurers for surgery they end up being given opioids for the pain, increasing the possibility of addiction.

Other provisions include a “Good Samaritan’’ provision, allowing someone who is using drugs to call for help when a companion needs medical attention without putting himself or herself at risk of arrest.

The governor did part ways with his health director on one particular issue.

In briefing reporters last week, Christ said there is no simple answer to alternatives to highly addictive opioids when treating pain. But she said the list of options could include medical marijuana which is legal in Arizona.

Original Source: https://www.pvtrib.com/news/2018/jan/24/lawmakers-hope-put-dent-opioid-crisis/

 

ARIZONA’S OPIOID EPIDEMIC-The Tragic 2017 Numbers

Over 700 Arizonans Died In Suspected Opioid-Related Deaths in 2017

 
Published: Monday, January 1, 2018 – 2:42pm
Updated: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 – 7:14am

More than 700 people in Arizona are believed to have died from opioid-related overdoses in 2017, according to end-of-the-year numbers from the Arizona Department of Health Services.

2017 was the first time state health officials began tracking opioid overdose data in real time. The initial results reveal that there were nearly 5,000 suspected opioid-related overdoses since mid-June. About 15 percent were fatal.

The majority of overdoses were clustered around the Phoenix and Tucson metro areas. Most of them happened inside a personal residence, not a health-care facility or public place. Over the past six months, the number of overdoses reported weekly has ranged from 100 to more than 250. The state aims to reduce the number of overdose deaths by 25 percent in the next five years.

Lawmakers are expected to take up legislation this year in response to the opioid epidemic, which Gov. Doug Ducey has declared a public health emergency.

Source: https://kjzz.org/

ViVRE is committed to helping end this epidemic in 2018, and beyond!

For support, guidance, and information please contact ViVRE at 480-389-4779.

PLEASE JOIN US!

Please join us for our Open House on Thursday December 7th!

Tour our new facility, meet our team, and learn more about our programs and services.

ALL ARE WELCOME!

Please RSVP to: Stacey.Cavaliere@VivreHousing.org

Aunt Rita’s AIDS Walk 2017

We are wholeheartedly honored to announce that we will be proud participants in the Arizona 10th Anniversary Aunt Rita’s AIDS Walk 2017. ViVRE has partnered up with its sister company, Building Blocks Counseling to help raise money for the essential services and care to those affected by HIV and AIDS.

AIDS Walk Arizona & Fun Run is Arizona’s largest and only grassroots charity fundraiser in Phoenix benefiting Aunt Rita’s Foundation and our 16 Agency Partners that provide prevention education, testing, and essential services to those affected by HIV and AIDS. Over the past decade, AIDS Walk Arizona has inspired tens of thousands of people to walk and donate, raising over a million dollars to combat HIV and AIDS. These funds remain a vital lifeline sustaining the prevention, care and advocacy programs Aunt Rita’s Foundation and our 16 Partner Agencies provide for the thousands of men, women, and families affected by the disease in Metro Phoenix.

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ViVRE is a Federally certified recognized 501 (c) (3) charitable origination. Unlike many organizations most of ViVRE money goes into direct services. We are saving lives and families. You can help with a small donation.

You could make a difference in someone’s life today by making a financial donation to an amazing nonprofit organization.

ViVRE’s 90 day program is specially designed for the reentry population. We provide quality housing to help people at risk, transition back into society. We have a clean and sober positive structured environment and because we are a nonprofit, we accept all clients regardless of their ability to pay.

Our supporters and volunteers come from all walks of life, ages and economic and social demographics.

Find your way to help ViVRE by donating your time and/or financial contribution.

Give happily and know that your blessings will multiply as you share with those in need. It’s the little things in life that tend to add up in a big way.   

ViVRE needs more than money to further our mission:  “to provide quality housing to help people at risk, transition back into society.”  Our men and women are tremendously supported by you tax deductible donations of clothing, extra food, bottled water and your professional expertise–  we are always looking for volunteers you can donate your time to help them learn budgeting, resume writing, and other special knowledge you may want to donate.

 Donations can be brought to our corporate offices at 4225 W Glendale Phoenix, AZ 85051.  Sometimes a driver can pick up donations as well Call our programs liaison Josh Hamilton at 602-626-8112 .  Thank you for helping us further our mission.